CURRENT PROJECTS

20 05 2019

Talk Programme

GRAIN hosts evening talks given by artists and photographers, throughout the year, and in collaboration with its partners. The talks are frequently programmed to coincide with the regional exhibitions, events and commissions.

To date we have been delighted to host talks by the following;

  • Mat Collishaw
  • Faye Claridge
  • Nathaniel Pitt and Donall Curtin
  • Tom Hunter
  • Sophy Rickett and Bettina von Zwehl
  • Bruce Gilden
  • David Birkett
  • Daniel Meadows
  • Simon Roberts
  • Andrew Jackson
  • Matthew Murray
  • David Hurn
  • Trish Morrissey
  • Guy Martin
  • Lua Ribeira
  • Liz Hingley
  • Geoff Broadway
  • Anand Chhabra
  • Mark Neville
  • Kate Peters
  • Arpita Shah
  • Katrina Sluis
  • Indre Serpytyte

 

GRAIN Projects is seeking an Intern with an interest in contemporary photography, the visual arts, projects and events and participatory opportunities, linked to audience development and community engagement. This is a unique opportunity to work with GRAIN to develop your knowledge, skills and professional practice.

The individual should be ambitious and organised and interested in supporting the development and delivery of our programme. They should have the ability to work on their own initiative and be interested in working with people including practitioners, audiences and participants.

The applicant must have some knowledge of professional photography practice.

Responsibilities will include:
– Supporting the team in developing ideas for events and activities
– Assisting with events, commissions and artist development activities
-Admin and marketing tasks
-Research including interactive research
-Communicating with creatives, communities and audiences

The applicant will be selected based on the aforementioned skills rather than educational history or in-depth work experience.

This role will pay a fee of £1000, inclusive of all travel expenses. This is a part time role & will be roughly be 10 – 12 working days across the 6 months.

Location: Midlands. The Intern will be expected to work remotely and at a range of venues in Birmingham and the West Midlands dependent on the GRAIN programme of activities. Background and context GRAIN Projects is an arts organisation established to benefit the photography community and to reach and engage with new audiences and collaborate with participants. GRAIN works with national and international partners. We research, develop and deliver new, ambitious high-quality opportunities to strengthen photography in the region including commissions, exhibitions and a professional development programme. We develop opportunities for artists, audiences and participants and promote the sector nationally and internationally.

If you are interested in applying for this opportunity please email your cv, a letter of application outlining why you are interested in this opportunity and how you feel you would fulfil this role and a testimonial from a current project contract, employer, lecturer or similar. Please email to Nicola.shipley@grainphotographyhub.co.uk

The deadline for this opportunity is 31 May 2019.

Please note applications must be provided in full as described above and no applications will be accepted after the deadline.

The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery 17th May – 22nd September 2019

Made in collaboration with local residents, Settling is an exhibition of pictures that tell the stories of people who have moved to Stoke-on-Trent from around the world. Stories include the life journey of World War Two veteran Walerian Tyminski, Pat Phillips the wife and business partner of a local artist, and Aida Haughton’s story on finding love in post-war Bosnia & Herzegovina.

The exhibition has two parts; The first is a projection of The Settling Archive and original photographs from contributor’s personal albums, digital versions of which will be gifted to the City Archives to preserve these stories. The second is Welcome Home, a series of diptychs by photographer Sam Ivin, made with contributors to the archive. Individuals own images are shown alongside a portrait created by Ivin, reflecting on the experiences that have bought them to Stoke-on-Trent. Audiences are also invited to share their own stories to the exhibition.

The exhibition is supported by GRAIN Projects, Stoke-on-Trent City Council and Arts Council England.

Rugby Art Gallery & Museum, 7 May – 22 June 2019

Indre Serpytyte (b. 1983 in Palanga, Lithuania) is an artist living and working in London, UK. Serpytyte is concerned with the impact of conflict and war on history and perception.  She works with photography, sculpture and installation.

GRAIN Projects commissioned Serpytyte to collaborate on research and make new work. This new project will be exhibited in partnership with Rugby Art Gallery & Museum.

It is estimated that throughout both World Wars, the Ministry of Munitions employed around a million female munitions workers in thousands of arms factories. These women played a crucial role in Britain’s strategy of “total war”. especially after Britain’s shell crisis in 1915 when there was a severe shortage of artillery shells on the front line.  The women worked extremely long hours as production was focused on a 24-hour shift pattern with only one day off a week.

Using archive material from Midlands collections as well as from the Imperial War Museum Serpytyte has examined the relationship between widely publicised propaganda images of the female factory workforce, as part of a political project of moral boosting, and the images, accounts and ephemera that tell the largely hidden and forgotten story of the so-called ‘munitionettes.’  In her work she will look at the history of female work and life in the context of war, violence and political strategy as well as the home as a place of waiting, loss and a repository for memory and objects. Domestic objects on shelves and mantlepieces provided keep sakes as well as reminders of lives and death. Most unsettling are the vases made from spent ammunition shells, many of which were made by women in munitions factories, decorated by soldiers and sent home for ornamentation.

In her work Serpytyte will use these vases as a way to explore the complex relationship between domesticity, ornament, labour, class, gender, war and trauma. The work will explore the objects and materials of war.

Artist Talk:
Rugby Art Gallery & Museum
13th June | 12.30pm
The event is free & no need to book, join the artist in the gallery from 12.30pm.

Image credit: ‘When the Golden Sun is Sinking (2019.04)’ (c) Indre Serpytyte

Photography For Whom? is a new periodical focused on socially-engaged photography. Published biannually, Photography For Whom? seeks to shine light on significant yet overlooked work of the past and to generate debate about contemporary practice, by bringing writing and practice from the community photography movement back into circulation from sources which are out of print, largely unknown or difficult to access. Each issue presents a historic text alongside a newly commissioned piece of writing to foster critical consideration of socially-engaged photography today. www.photographyforwhom.com

Photography For Whom? is edited by Anthony Luvera and supported by GRAIN Projects and Multistory.

For more information and to purchase a copy of Photography For Whom? Please visit – photographyforwhom.com

GRAIN is pleased to announce the next event in its programme of professional development activities. Our Portfolio Development Day will be delivered at and in partnership with Multistory as part of BLAST! Festival, on Saturday 29th June at Wesley Methodist Church, 10am – 5pm.

During the morning our guest expert reviewers will give short presentations to advise on key features of portfolio & professional development, and in the afternoon there will be opportunities for one to one portfolio advice and reviews. Each participant will have the opportunity to see 3 of our reviewers, the one to one sessions last 20 minutes.

The day is a must for emerging photographers and has been devised to support emerging practitioners, students and artists who work in photography to get advice and reviews from leading photography experts (practitioners, curators and commissioners).

Please note there will be a maximum of 25 attendees to enable a focussed day. Please book early, once you have booked you will be sent a form to select the reviewers you would like to see.

Date – Saturday 29th June
Time – 10am – 5pm
Location – Wesley Methodist Church, 291 High Street, West Bromwich,West Midlands,  B70 8ND

Tickets are priced at £25 or £18 (plus booking fees) and can be booked here.

If you have any questions about the day please contact stephen.burke@grainphotographyhub.co.uk.

Reviewers & Speakers

Anthony Luvera
Anthony Luvera is a socially engaged artist, writer and educator who has collaborated with people who have experienced homelessness in cities and towns across the United Kingdom for over fifteen years. The long-term collaborative projects he creates with homeless people and other community groups have been exhibited widely in galleries, museums and public spaces, including Tate Liverpool, London Underground’s Art on the Underground, British Museum, National Portrait Gallery, Belfast Exposed Photography, Australian Centre for Photography, PhotoIreland, Malmö Fotobiennal, Goa International Photography Festival, and Les Recontres D’Arles Photographie. Anthony is Principal Lecturer and Course Director of MA Photography and Collaboration at Coventry University. He also designs and facilitates public education programmes for the National Portrait Gallery, Royal Academy of Arts, The Photographers’ Gallery, Barbican Art Gallery, and community photography projects across the UK. 

Liz Hingley
Liz Hingley is photographer, anthropologist and curator working on multi-platform projects that explore systems of belief and belonging around the world. Her publications include the books Under God’ (Dewi Lewis, 2010), End of Lines, Shanghai (Be-Poles, 2013), Home Made in Smethwick (Multistory, 2016) and Shanghai Sacred (Washington University Press, 2018).  Her photographs and writings feature in global media publications such as Time, Le Monde, Financial Times, The Guardian, and New Scientist as well as in academic journals. Liz has received numerous awards including The Photophilanthropy Award, Prix Virginia and the Getty Grant. She is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Birmingham and University College London. Between 2013-16 she was based in China  as a Visiting Scholar of the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences. Liz is also a trustee as well as curator at SIDE in Newcastle, and is actively seeking documentary work to exhibit in the gallery. 

Niall Mcdiarmid
Niall’s work is about documenting the people and landscape of Britain. For the past 8 years, he has been travelling across the country building an archive of images with a distinctive style which show a changing population at this significant time.

Niall’s work is held by the National Portrait Gallery, Museum of London, Martin Parr Foundation and the Sir Elton John Photography Collection.

Sebah Chaudhry
Sebah Chaudhry is a Freelance Creative Project Manager. She is experienced in working at international world class festivals and events. She is currently Creative Producer on an international British Council funded project, The Place I Call Home, connecting the UK to the Gulf region, culminating in a series of exhibitions from September 2019 – March 2020. She has also just curated a show by Alina Kisina at Diffusion Festival in Wales.

From 2013 – 2017, Sebah was the Festival Coordinator at FORMAT Festival, the UK’s largest contemporary photography festival. She was a key member in the delivery of the biennale festival, working on exhibitions, events, the UK’s largest portfolio review and other FORMAT projects in the UK and internationally.

She has previously worked with Photo Beijing, Beijing; Unseen Platform, Amsterdam; Kasselfotobook Festival, Kassel; Fotofestiwal, Łódz; Rhubarb-Rhubarb, Birmingham; Dong Gang, South Korea and Fotofest, Houston.

Sebah is an avid networker and an advocate for the promotion of emerging artists, encouraging both artists and others to get involved in the art scene. Currently UK editor for thephotoexhibitionarchive.com, Advisory Board Member for 1623 theatre company and Steering Group member for FORMAT Festival, Derby.

 

Malcolm Dickson
Malcolm is a curator, writer and organiser. He is the Director of Street Level Photoworks, a leading photography arts organisation in Scotland – celebrating 30 years in existence this year – that provides artists and the public with a range of opportunities to make and engage with photography. He co-ordinates a programme which embraces different genres of photography which is extended through a network of local and community venues, regional art galleries, and through national and international partners. Recent exchange residencies have included cities such as Quebec City, Berlin, and Marseille, with further collaborations taking place in 2019 with Finland and Ireland. He runs the Photography Networks in Scotland platform which profiles exhibitions and events in photography across Scotland. Street Level is a lead partner in Scotland’s Season of Photography.

A former Senior Research Fellow at Dundee University, recent writings include the chapter ‘Slender Margins and Delicate Tensions: Projects by European Video Pioneers Stansfield/Hooykaas’ in the book ‘European Women’s Video Art’ (John Libbey Publications 2019).

Interested in viewing bodies of work in their early stages which impartial advice may help  ANDsubstantially developed bodies of work from artists and photographers, which blend experimental approaches, conceptual or issue based themes; social landscape work and new documentary; work that tells a compelling story; lyrical and narrative or abstract and non-narrative; photography based work that intersects with other media. Advice will be given on the basis of the work seen. No fashion or commercial work.

If you have any questions about the day please contact stephen.burke@grainphotographyhub.co.uk

 

11 03 2019

Celebrating Age

We are collaborating with the Lench’s Trust and photographers Kate Peters and Stephen
Burke on a new project.

GRAIN Projects is working with older people in three residential homes and in collaboration with the Lench’s Trust to engage with older people in Birmingham, using photography to celebrate and tell
stories of families, achievements and unique life stories. Through the collaboration with residents at
Lench’s Trust housing schemes in Quinton, Moseley, and Sutton the project will also tell the history
and story of Birmingham.

The project is being made possible by support from The National Lottery Heritage Fund. ‘Celebrating Age’ has been awarded a grant of £5.500 which will enable the people’s photographs and stories to be developed as an archive, an exhibition and publication.

Everyone has a story to tell, and the project will provide a dynamic, visual story of people’s lives through portraiture and family archives. As well as workshops to share the participant’s photographs, keepsakes, memories and photo collections, photographer Kate Peters will be commissioned to create new portraits that celebrate age and commemorate the Lench’s Trust.

The visual heritage that is discovered and shared will include community histories, from the early
1900s through to the present day, with images of families, descendants, momentous occasions, small
personal moments, work, industry, weddings, birthdays, new homes, new babies, all celebrating the
residents and their homes in the city.

‘Celebrating Age’ is a partnership with the Lench’s Trust, generously supported by The National
Lottery Heritage Fund.

GRAIN is delighted to have awarded the FORMAT Festival Portfolio Award to Sophie Gerrard for her work ‘The Flows’.  This is the third time GRAIN has awarded a special prize at Format International Photography Festival.

“The Flows (from the Norse ‘ floi’ meaning ‘flat, deep, wet land’) focuses on the gentle and undulating peatlands of the Flow Country, located in Caithness and Sutherland in the far north of mainland Scotland.

Peatlands are a globally rare habitat vital in combatting climate change. They cover only a tiny amount (3%) of the planet’s land surface, yet peatlands hold almost 30% of all terrestrial carbon – twice as much as all the world’s forests. Scotland contains a vast amount (13%) of this vital global resource, and the Flow Country is widely considered to be the largest expanse of blanket peat bog in the world.

Historically peatlands have been seen as empty and valueless wastelands, of little benefit to humans yet still forced into marginal production for the leanest of economic return. During the 1980s, the Conservative government under Margaret Thatcher offered tax incentives to the super rich, resulting in vast areas of the Flow Country being planted with non-native coniferous Sitka spruce which drained, damaged and ultimately killed large areas of the bog. Over 80% of the UK’s peatlands have been damaged by years of such mismanagement.

Survival of the peatlands is a touchstone for the environmental health of the nation. These almost magical places are now being painstakingly revived through conservation by the RSPB and their partners. Sophie Gerrard’s photographs look at how these natural resources fit into Scotland’s topography and consciousness, linking people to the land, and vice-versa.”

The Flows is showing in the Document Scotland group show Contested Land – Set against the current political backdrop Document Scotland’s four photographers examine the complex relationship between the nation’s people, history and landscape.

Showing at:
Perth Museum 23rd April -23rd June, 2019.

Launch event and talks 9th May 2019
Dunoon Burgh Hall, 20th July – 18th Aug., 2019.
Inverness FLOW Photofest, Sept., 2019.
PhotoNorth festival, 30 Nov. – 2nd Dec., 2019.

Sophie Gerrard (Scottish, b.1978) is an award winning photographer specialising in contemporary documentary stories with environmental and social themes.

Sophie began her career in environmental sciences before studying photography at Edinburgh College of Art followed by an MA in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at London College of Communication.

Her first major project, E-Wasteland was awarded a Jerwood Photography Award a Fuji Bursary and a Magenta Fast Forward Award. She has since been shortlisted and nominated for the Prix Pictet Award several years running and the 2015 Remote Photo Prize.

Sophie’s editorial and long term personal work has been published widely by clients including The Guardian, The New York Times, The Telegraph Magazine, FT Magazine, The Washington Post, Esquire Magazine, Foto8, The British Journal of Photography, Portfolio Magazine, Lucky Peach, Le Monde and many others.

Solo and group exhibitions include OFF_festival Bratislava 2018, The Scottish National Portrait Gallery (2015), Brighton Photoworks Biennial (2014), Impressions Gallery, Bradford (2014), Street Level Gallery (2014), Scotland House, Brussels (2014), Unseen Amsterdam (2013), Flowers East Gallery (2008), The Arbetes Museum (2008), Paris Photo (2008) and the Photographers’ Gallery (2012/13). Her work is held in a number of collections including St Andrews University Special Collection, The National Galleries of Scotland, Couttes Bank private collection, StatOil Collection and the Sir Elton John private Collection.

In 2012 Sophie co-founded Document Scotland, a collective of internationally acclaimed photographers dedicated to chronicling the social, cultural and economic life in Scotland.

Sophie is a lecturer in photography at Edinburgh Napier University, a senior lecturer at Falmouth University MA Photography online and a member of the board of trustees for Impressions Gallery in Bradford.

Sophie’s work has been published in several books including “New Light” The Jerwood Foundation (2009), “Tunnock” Cafe Royal Books (2015), “The Bigger Picture”, Impressions Gallery (2015) and “Compassion, Commitment, Community” The Savitri Waney Charitable Trust (2013).

Sophie is represented by The Photographers’ Gallery in London.

www.sophiegerrard.com

East Meets West is a series of Masterclasses organised by GRAIN in partnership with FORMAT Festival, QUAD, Derby, which offered photographers from the East and West Midlands an immersion in their subject matter and a unique opportunity for emerging photographers to receive feedback from industry experts.

Seventeen participants formed the cohort and each photographer developed a body of work between October 2018 to February 2019. It has been an inspiring experience to see how each participant’s work has developed over these months, and to see how the group have formulated a critical and supportive framework.

We would like to thank the reviewers: Andrew Jackson, Matthew Murray, Peter Dench, Natasha Caruana, Kate Peters, Michael Sargeant, Anthony Luvera and Harry Hardie, who pushed the boundaries of each participant’s personal development through portfolio reviews and by offering fantastic advice.

For FORMAT19 the participants work is exhibited as a digital showcase at QUAD. In addition, the group have curated a fringe exhibition for the opening weekend of FORMAT at The Market Hall, Derby, demonstrating the group’s enthusiasm and ambition.

This year’s exhibiting photographers are: Anand Chhabra; Emma Case; Hazel Simcox; Ilona Denton; Jonny Bark; Kaya Isaac, Kristy Clark; Liam Pye; Luca Bailey; Luke Williams; Maryam Wahid; Oliver Tooke; Phillip Singleton; Simon Burrows; Tom Wynne and Tristan Poyser.

East Meets West is a partnership with FORMAT International Photography Festival and Quad and is supported by Arts Council England, Derby University and Birmingham City University.

In 2016 GRAIN Projects commissioned artist Edgar Martins to respond to Winson Green in Birmingham and the site and community of HMP Birmingham. Martins is creating a significant, multifaceted body of work developed from a collaboration with HMP Birmingham (the largest, until recently privately run, category B prison in the Midlands, now government run), its inmates, their families as well as a myriad of other local organisations and individuals. Using the social context of incarceration as a starting point, Martins explores the philosophical concept of absence and addresses a broader consideration of the status of the photograph when questions of visibility, ethics, aesthetics and documentation intersect.

From a humanist perspective the work seeks to reflect on how one deals with the absence of a loved one, brought on by enforced separation.

From an ontological perspective it seeks answers to the following questions: how does one represent a subject that eludes visualization, that is absent or hidden from view? And what does it mean for photography, in an epistemological, ontological, aesthetic and ethical sense, if it does not identify with the photographic subject but the absence of it’s subject?

The work shifts between image and information, between fiction and evidence, strategically deploying visual and textual details in tandem so that the viewer becomes aware of what exists outside the confines of the frame.

Three distinct chapters are employed in the work, each encompassing speculative, documentary and historical archive imagery (ranging from portratiture, landscape, still-life, abstraction, etc), text, projection, audio and photo-installation, signalling the artist’s growing inclination towards a more interdisciplinary perspective of the practice of photography and the experience of images.

Across this complex and radical body of work, Martins has worked with archives from renowned European institutions, leading Portuguese physicist João Seixas, inmates and their families connected to HMP Birmingham as well as a variety of other individual and organisations such as colleges, community centres, charities, fire departments, etc.

We are delighted that the work will be exhibited at Quad, Derby as part of FORMAT International Photography Festival 2019.

 

 

 

Commission by GRAIN Projects, in collaboration with HMP Birmingham and supported by Arts Council England and Birmingham City University.


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